“Heard” but not seen: Being Black in South Korea
August 11, 2022

Accordingly, for many nightclubs in Seoul, providing a foreigner-free experience is a selling point to attract customers, as a certain contingent of the clientele is more comfortable enjoying their night solely in the company of ethnic Koreans.

Author: Arian Khameneh and David D. Lee

Arian Khameneh is an Iranian-Danish freelance journalist. Drawing on his background in sociology, he focuses on emerging social and cultural tendencies, covering subjects ranging from post-capitalism to female bodybuilders in Korea.

Having studied journalism from Ohio University, David D. Lee is currently a freelance reporter based around Seoul. His stories for foreign publications like the South China Morning Post and VICE News try to investigate the developing social and cultural affairs of South Korea.

A Black man stands in front of a club entrance where a sign says its K-hip hop night. Below that, a sign reads, "no foreigners, no Moroccans, Egyptias, Algerians"
Story

“Heard” but not seen: Being Black in South Korea

Accordingly, for many nightclubs in Seoul, providing a foreigner-free experience is a selling point to attract customers, as a certain contingent of the clientele is more comfortable enjoying their night solely in the company of ethnic Koreans.

Unbias your inbox

Do you share our mission? Sign up for our newsletter so we can keep in touch!

Help improve our work!

We’re researching your journalism experience at Unbias the News, and we would appreciate you sharing your thoughts, experiences and ideas.


We want to get to know you, our reader, and the knowledge and understanding of what you want will influence our approach to telling better stories with which you, our audience, can connect.